April 21, 2017 Radio Commentary

Big-Time Correction!

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, April 21, 2017 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

I need to correct an error I made last week in my report. When I re-read H.B. 510, I found that only the (d) Section of Georgia Code 3-3-21 is being repealed, and there’s no possibility that a casino or liquor store or beer garden will be built next to a school or church or public housing development in Georgia.

That means, H.B. 510 is a good bill that repeals Section (d) to equalize distance requirements on alcoholic businesses in all counties, regardless of population. Currently, counties with 175,000 to 195,000 residents are required to measure distances from the property-line of the business to the property-line of the school, church or housing development. H.B. 510, simply, makes the distance from building-to-building in highly populated counties, as it always has been in other counties.

When H.B. 510 becomes law July 1st, sales of distilled spirits will continue to be no less than 200 yards from a school or college or other educational building; the sale of wine or other malt beverages will continue to be at least 100 yards away, and restrictions on selling liquor-by-the-drink in hotels, private clubs and other businesses will not change. Continue reading

April 14, 2017 Radio Commentary

Liquor Wins, Kids Lose

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, April 14, 2017 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

Today, I have some questions for you.  Why would three Democrats and three Republicans in the Georgia House initiate the repeal of a law that prohibits the sale of alcohol near schools, churches or colleges?  Three Democrats – Smyre, Hugley, and Buckner – and three Republicans – Hawkins, Pezold, and Richard Smith – coauthored H.B. 510 to completely eliminate the Georgia law outlining specific mandatory distances between the selling of alcoholic beverages and schools, churches and college campuses.

H.B. 510 was introduced February 27th and passed the House four days later.  It went to the Senate Regulated Industries committee March 22nd and passed the Senate within two days. It repeals Code Section 3-3-21 and leaves that section of law blank, reserved for future legislation.

So, effective July 1st, no longer must sellers of (a) distilled spirits be 100 yards away from a church building or 200 yards away from a school or educational building, school grounds, or college campus; no longer must the sale of (b) wine or beer be 100 yards from a school building, school grounds, or college campus, or within 100 yards of a government-owned alcoholic treatment center; no longer must the sale of alcoholic beverages for (c) consumption on the premises be 100 yards away from a housing authority project that has 300 units or less owned or is operated under the Housing Authorities Law. Continue reading

April 7, 2017 Radio Commentary

Driver-less Vehicles Coming to Georgia Roads

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, April 7, 2017 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

Some day in the near future little Sam or Susie might not need a driver’s license to get to school, and they won’t need you, either. Autonomous vehicles have been authorized and can be legally registered in Georgia, when S.B. 219 becomes law on July 1st.

If you have an autonomous vehicle equipped with the right hardware and software, you or someone else may program the vehicle with the appropriate destination. Then, tell the kids to get in and buckle up. When the vehicle’s program is activated, they’re off to school in a driver-less, computer driven vehicle that weaves through traffic, makes the appropriate stops and turns, and arrives at the programmed destination to deposit the kids. Then, the empty-of-all-human-occupants vehicle parks or proceeds to its next programmed destination.

If no one in the vehicle has a driver’s license, that’s okay. They’ll be passengers, not drivers. Hardware and software of the “fully autonomous motor vehicle with the automated driving system engaged” is programmed to perform real-time steering, accelerating and slowing down, accident avoidance, and proper-response traffic maneuvers. Visualize it as a vehicle operating without anyone in the chauffeur’s seat, or the high-tech simile of a “head-less horseman.” Continue reading

March 2017 Newsletter

Selected Bills that Failed to Pass the 2017 Session

Simultaneously, as March 30th ended, the President of the
Senate and Speaker of the House hit their respective podium
with a gavel and declared, “Sine die!” ending this year’s
session with no day set to reconvene.

Loss: A Good Bill That Failed to Pass

H.R. 511 Paramount Right to Life of All Human Beings. The death of H.R. 511 means more babies will die in utero via abortion.

Victory! When these Bills Failed to Pass

H.B. 16 Bullying provides extra penalties for bullying thought to be motivated by gender, sexual orientation or gender identity or gender expression.
H.B. 492 Penalty for Crimes based on Gender, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity increases punishment for aggravated assault thought to be motivated by alternate lifestyles.
S.B. 119, Civil Rights Status for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity prohibits lifestyle screening of applicants seeking rental in homes or public accommodations.
S.B. 145 Repeal Aggravated Sodomy Offense for Gender, Gender ID, Sexual Orientation deletes penalties relating to childhood sexual abuse, and its application by courts.
H.B. 488 Amend Two State Laws: (a) Civil Rights Law; (b) Commerce and Trade Law to prohibit lifestyle screening of employees and consumers concerning housing; gas stations; sports and entertainment; labor and industry; public officers and employees; and the EEOC.
H.B. 230 Discrimination against Christian Students and Christian Schools requires tuition grants or scholarships to be used only in schools or programs promoting alternate lifestyles.
S.B. 64 National Popular Vote (NPV) Agreement between States promotes an Article V Constitutional Convention to change the election process for presidents and vice presidents.
H.B. 531 National Popular Vote (NPV) Agreement between States, same effect as S.B. 64
S.R. 249 Constitutional Amendment Authorizing Six Casinos, not two as proposed in bills
S.B. 79 Destination Resort (Casinos) legalizes casinos and creates a Gaming Commission.
H.B. 158 Destination Resort (Casinos) Act, legalizes casinos, creates a Gaming Commission.

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