October 2014 Newsletter

No Perfect Choice? Select the “Less-Bad” Candidate, and Vote!

In the 1986 race for the U.S. House of Representatives, Arlan Strangeland of Barnesville, MN, defeated Collin Peterson by 142 votes out of 186,320 – less than one vote per precinct.

  • Pennsylvania 1974 – in a special election in the 12th Congressional District, John Murtha defeated Harry Fox b y a total of 122 votes. There were 430 precincts in the district and Murtha won by a margin of one-fourth of a vote per precinct!
  • Presidential Election 1960 – John F. Kennedy defeated Richard M. Nixon by 113,000 votes. That was about one-half vote per precinct.
  • Texas 1948 – Lyndon B. Johnson was elected to the U.S. Senate by 87 votes out of 988,295 votes cast in 6,000 precincts. That computes to 1/69th of a vote per precinct.
  • In 1918, Woodrow Wilson carried the State of California less than one vote per precinct. California’s electoral vote made the difference and Wilson was re-elected President.1

Know nothing about the candidates? Party Platforms reflect their positions.

Click here to view the party platforms and to read the rest of the October 2014 Newsletter.

October 31, 2014 Radio Commentary

YOUR Vote REALLY Counts!

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, October 31, 2014 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

You may be disgusted with your choice of candidates, but, if history repeats itself, your vote may decide the election. Consider this.

In the 1986 race for the U.S. House of Representatives, Arlan Strangeland of Barnesville, MN defeated Collin Peterson by 142 votes out of 186,320. That’s less than one vote per precinct.

In a 1974 special election in Pennsylvania, John Murtha defeated Harry Fox by a total of 122 votes in 430 precincts of the 12th Congressional District. Murtha won by a margin of one-fourth of a vote per precinct!

In the 1960 Presidential Election, John F. Kennedy defeated Richard Nixon by 113,000 votes. That was about one-half vote per precinct.

In 1948 in Texas, Lyndon Johnson was elected to the U.S. Senate by 87 votes out of 988,295 in 6,000 precincts. That means he won by 1/69th of a vote per precinct.

In 1918, Woodrow Wilson carried the State of California with less than one vote per precinct. California’s electoral vote made the difference and Wilson was re-elected President.

If you’re not enthusiastic about the candidates, remember this. There’s always a candidate that’s less-bad than the other one. So, don’t play “sick” on November 4th. It’s Election Day! Continue reading

October 24, 2014 Radio Commentary

Principles for American Renewal

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, October 24, 2014 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

They waited ’til October 2nd to do it, but finally the Republican Party announced their Principles for American Renewal.

The foundation for the Republican Principles is to honor the Constitution of the United States, which they value and want preserved. As their First Principle, Republicans want to expand the economy, which would give hard-working Americans better wages and more opportunities. Building on that foundation, their Second Principle is to pass a Balanced Budget Amendment, make government more efficient and leave the next generation with opportunity, not debt.

Fixing healthcare is the Third Principle. Republicans want to start over with real reform that puts patients and doctors back in charge of healthcare. And Number Five says no veteran should have to wait in line for months or years just to see a doctor. Continue reading

October 17, 2014 Radio Commentary

Don’t Call It “Medical Marijuana!”

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, October 17, 2014 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

During the medical marijuana study committee meeting a couple of weeks ago, law enforcement officers stood firmly against legalizing marijuana. They are particularly concerned about the cultivation of marijuana, and specified that IF marijuana IS grown in Georgia, the growing must be done in indoor laboratories under strict control.

During the meeting, a Gwinnett Coalition for Health worker said, “We are concerned about substance abuse and we’re concerned with dispensaries. When dispensaries grow [marijuana], abuse expands. Black marketing marijuana is already in other states. There are big, big dollars behind this. Lots of money is involved.”

She continued, “Look at the people who are here. They are not children,” pointing out that the audience included business people, who want marijuana legalized for ALL purposes, not just for medicine, but for recreation, too.

Then she said, “[Using] the term ‘medical marijuana’ is a negative ‘norming’ thing [that makes it sound like a normal thing to do]. The message implied by the term is, ‘Since it’s medically good for you, it must be okay to smoke,’” reminding them that the number of young people using marijuana has increased since states passed medical marijuana laws. Continue reading