May 2017 Newsletter

“Gray Death” Opioid Confirmed in Georgia

“If you put this in your body you will die, no questions asked. This is something that I want to be very clear about … it’s not a scare tactic … it’s not a shock factor. …if you put this drug into your body you will die, it will kill you.
There’s a reason why it’s been nicknamed Grey Death. It is deadly.”
– Shelby County Alabama Drug Enforcement Task Force Commander Clay Hammac

Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman Russ Baer says gray death is a combination of heroin, fentanyl and other fentanyl-class substances, such as Carfentanil, a tranquilizer for use on elephants and other large animals. Atlanta law enforcement coined the term “gray gravel heroin” in 2012. Recently, the GBI confirmed Georgia’s first gray death victim as a 24-year-old female in Brookhaven who died February 10, 2017, and described the opioid as follows:

“The gray material was found to contain a toxic cocktail of opiate drugs. The ingredients vary, but often contain heroin, fentanyl, furanyl fentanyl, and U-47700, mixed together in the same powder. The solid material has the appearance of gray concrete mixing powder, with texture variations from light/powdery to chunky/rock-like.”

Reportedly, gray death can be absorbed through the skin, is 10,000 times more potent than morphine, 100 times more powerful than fentanyl, and includes Carfentanil, the elephant tranquilizer described as “crazy dangerous” by a Colorado DEA spokesman. The GBI lab first identified it as gray death in March and, so far, has found it in about 50 different drug seizures.

Three New Laws to Fight Opioid Epidemic in Georgia

  • To read about the new laws the rest of this newsletter in PDF format, please click here.

May 26, 2017 Radio Commentary

New Laws: Two for Guns, Three for Opioids

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, May 26, 2017 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

When Governor Deal vetoed last year’s campus carry bill, he was concerned that it would have allowed firearms on preschool campuses or in disciplinary hearings or in faculty and administrative offices.

Since this year’s campus carry bill alleviates those concerns and restricts firearms in even more sensitive places, Governor Deal explained his change-of-heart this way: “While H.B. 280 addresses the rights and restrictions relating to weapons carry license holders on a college campus, it in effect may have greater significance for students who are going to or coming from a campus.  Unfortunately, in parts of the state, the path to higher education travels through dangerous territory…. In recent years, we’ve witnessed college students fall victim to violent attacks in or while traveling to libraries and academic buildings, and while traveling to and from their homes to class.”

H.B. 280, also, prohibits the carrying of concealed weapons onto or into athletic events; student housing, dormitories, fraternities and sororities; preschools and childcare facilities; as well as rooms or spaces used by colleges, career academies or other special schools.  Continue reading

April 25, 2014 Radio Commentary

29-Page Gun Law

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, April 25 2014 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

Good morning, Jim. The last day of the session is called “the most dangerous day of the session” for good reason. The hectic pace is so confusing it takes several days for House and Senate offices to sort out what happened. But, this year’s last day produced a new law to uphold the right of Georgians to carry firearms in public and on private property, even in declared emergencies.

H.B. 60 introduced by Representative Doug Holt drew its first breath of life on January 16th, and its supporters drew a sigh of relief when it passed the last day of the session. H.B. 60 defines firearms as “any handgun, rifle, shotgun, or similar device or weapon that will be or can be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive or electrical charge.” Continue reading

April 2014 Newsletter

Passed: Cancer Coverage Equity; Obamacare
Navigator Program to Cease!

 When H.B. 943 becomes law, cancer coverage will be enhanced, Georgia will not implement or operate a health exchange, and navigator programs will end when the navigator grant money is spent.

Conjoined: The Tale of Two Bills

[For 40 days after the session, the governor may veto, sign or allow bills to become law without his signature.]
When District 27’s Representative Lee Hawkins of Gainesville introduced H.B. 943 February 6th, he had no idea how important it would be. From its introduction by Representative Jason Spencer of District 180, H.B. 707 was in trouble. But, thankfully, Representative Hawkins, put his own H.B. 943 at risk to allow Representative Spencer to amend it with critical parts of H.B. 707, and it paid off. On March 18th, the amended bill passed, doubly benefiting Georgians.

Passed within H.B. 943 were parts of H.B. 707, the “Georgia Health Care Freedom Act.” So, when the governor signs it or by July 1st, a new law in Georgia will include this paragraph: “31-1-40. Neither the state nor any department, agency, bureau, authority, office, or other unit of the state nor any political subdivision of the state shall expend or use moneys, human resources, or assets to advocate or intended to influence the citizens of this state in support of the voluntary expansion by the State of Georgia of eligibility for medical assistance in furtherance of the federal ‘Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,’ beyond the eligibility criteria in effect on the effective date of this Code section under the provisions of … the federal Social Security Act as amended.”

Additional Requirements of H.B. 707, as Passed in H.B 943

  • The attorney general will enforce provisions of the Georgia Health Care Freedom Act.
  • Bona fide educational instruction about Obamacare is not prohibited.
  • MEDICAID programs will not be affected.
  • Establishment or operation of a state exchange for Obamacare is prohibited.
  • Conversion of an existing program into a state exchange is prohibited.
  • Navigator programs will be terminated and not renewed when navigator grants expire.
  • To read the rest of this newsletter in PDF format, please click here.