May 12, 2017 Radio Commentary

New Laws for Education

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, May 12, 2017 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

Since 11:59 p.m. last Tuesday was the end of Governor Deal’s 40-day period to sign or veto bills, today’s subject is two education bills he decided to sign.  One became law the day he signed it; the other becomes law July 1st.

Of eight education bills he signed April 27th, only S.B. 211 concerning federal assessments of student progress became law that day.  A mention of “grouping” in S.B. 211 reminded me that, until recent years, students were always grouped according to learning ability, but not so, now.  Though grouping is mentioned in this bill, it’s unclear whether grouping is for testing only or for everyday classwork.

Also, it’s important to note that writing performance will continue to be assessed within reading, math, science, or social studies assessments, but there’s no mention of cursive writing, which seems to be more or less abandoned in today’s education.  What a loss!

S.B. 211 gives the State Board of Education until July 1st to include in workgroups a component about maximum flexibility for local assessments under federal law.  It, also, protects the right of students who take dual credit courses to be school valedictorian or salutatorian, which could affect this year’s graduating students, since it became law on April 27th.

Several weeks will pass before H.B. 37 becomes law on July 1st and prohibits sanctuary policies on private college and university campuses.  The bill says violators will lose funding, but time will tell whether that happens.   H.B. 37’s delayed date-of-effect reminds me of the time Moses asked Pharaoh when he wanted God to remove judgment and, surprisingly, Pharaoh said tomorrow, leaving Egypt under that particular judgment for another 24 hours or so.  Maybe wise administrators will use the weeks before H.B. 37 becomes law to redirect their illegal students. Continue reading

April 2017 Newsletter

Lookout for a New Book: Communism for Kids

 The Washington Free Beacon reports that “Communism for Kids,” written by a German author who specializes in political theory and “queer politics,” was released last month. The thesis of the children’s book is that communism is “not that hard,” but has not been implemented in the right way.
– “Brainwashing Shocker: MIT Press Releases ‘Communism for Kids’ Book,”
by Selwyn Duke, 4-15-17

The publication of Communism for Kids is an example of trouble on the horizon. It presents political theory in the simple terms of a children’s story, with illustrations of lovable little revolutionaries experiencing their political awakening. The press kit that comes with the book described the set-up with this: “Once upon a time, people yearned to be free of the misery of capitalism. How could their dreams come true?” Then, the author admits that the book is geared not only to kindergartners, but is perfect for all ages and all who desire a better world.

Lookout: Communism/Socialism Planned for U.S.A.

Communist Party USA has announced a “Constitution for the New Socialist Republic in North America.” Party members say they are planning for a “revolution” against capitalism, with violence if necessary, because they think the “present capitalist-imperialist system” should be replaced with a “radically new economic system.”
– “Unveiled: Constitution for New Socialist North America,”
Article Published 11-16-2010 at 9:39 PM

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March 3, 2017 Radio Commentary

Skewing the Culture via Education

Radio Commentary, 90.7, 91.7 New Life FM, March 3, 2017 – By Sue Ella Deadwyler

This year the culture changers got a head-start when H.B. 16 was pre-filed and, officially, introduced February 2nd. H.B. 16 is a repeat of last year’s bill about bullying in schools. Georgia’s current law against bullying in school applies to all students equally; it does not categorize students; and its standard penalties are administered to violators, regardless of their personal identity.

H.B. 16 changes the focus of the bullying law by classifying students according to their actual or perceived sexual orientation by inserting a laundry list of alternate lifestyles – gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.

Since sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression include lifestyles that some people may or may not agree with, there’s a real possibility that negative comments about certain behaviors may be uttered by students K – 12.

This is what the bill says on lines 237 and 238: “Nothing in this Code section is intended to interfere with the First Amendment rights of free speech and expression of any person affected.” Continue reading

February 20, 2017 Newsletter

Casino Embedded in “Immediate Action Needed!

Threat Percolating under the Gold Dome; Will Georgia get two casinos or six?
S.B. 79 and H.B. 158, as introduced, authorize two casinos.
S.R. 249 proposed constitutional amendment authorizes SIX!

S.R. 249, a proposed constitutional amendment dropped in the House hopper February 17th to be officially introduced February 20th, authorizes the General Assembly to license “no more than six” destination resorts (with embedded casinos) “at any given time.” Six casinos are three times the number of casinos authorized in the original versions of S.B. 79 and H.B. 158.

S.R. 249 prohibits all other forms of casino gaming, stating that the prohibition will be enforced by law. Proceeds from licensing, regulation, and taxing of casinos will be used for education after pay-outs, operating expenses, and addictive gambling prevention programs are funded.

Legalizing Casino Gambling could authorize Indian¹ Casinos in Georgia
The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act is a 1988 U.S. federal law that establishes the jurisdictional framework governing Indian gaming. There was no federal gaming structure before this Act (Pub. L. 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.), that established the following three gaming classes:
Class I gaming is defined as (1) traditional Indian gaming, that may be part of tribal ceremonies, and celebrations, and (2) social gaming for minimal prizes. Class 1 gaming regulatory authority is vested exclusively in tribal governments.
Class II gaming is a game of chance commonly known as bingo and, if played in the same location, includes card games that are played exclusively against other players rather than against the house or a player acting as a bank. The Act specifically excludes from the definition of class II games slot machines or electronic facsimiles of any game of chance.
Class III gaming is broad. It includes all forms of gaming that are neither class I nor II. Games commonly played at casinos, such as slot machines, blackjack, craps, and roulette, clearly fall in the class III category, as well as wagering games and electronic facsimiles of any game of chance. Generally, class III is often referred to as casino-style gaming. For Indian tribes to establish and operate casinos, the following conditions must be in place:
(a) Class III gaming must be permitted in the state.
(b) The tribe and state must have negotiated a compact with approved regulatory procedures.
(c) The Tribe must have a tribal gaming ordinance approved by the commission chairman.
A 1976 U.S. Supreme Court decision was interpreted to allow states to address only “crimes and civil disputes” in tribal issues. That ruling opened the gates for the Indian gaming industry to become the most widely successful economic initiative on reservations across the country.

ACTION – OPPOSE S.B. 79 and S.R. 249. Vote expected by Thursday, February 23rd. Call Regulated Industries and Utilities Committee Senators Jeffares, Ch., 463-1376; Ginn, V-Ch., 404 656-4700; McKoon, Sec., 463-3931; Cowsert, 463-1366; Gooch, 656-9221; Harbison, 656-0074; Henson, 656-0085; Hill, 656-5038; Kennedy, 656-0045; Lucas, 656-5035; Miller, 656-7454; Mullis, 656-0057; Shafer, 656-0048; Unterman, 463-1368.

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